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Small Business Grants

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs are structured in three phases, as described below. Note that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer website offers many resources and updates on this unique grant program.

Phase I

The objective of Phase I is to establish the technical merit and feasibility of the proposed R/R&D efforts and to determine the quality of performance of the small business awardee organization prior to providing further federal support in Phase II.

Phase II

The objective of Phase II is to continue the R/R&D efforts initiated in Phase I. Typically, only Phase I awardees are eligible for a Phase II award. Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to discuss proposed deviations from the budget and project duration listed in an FOA with NIDCD staff before submitting an application.

Phase IIb Competing Continuation Awards

The NIDCD will accept competing continuation Phase IIb SBIR/STTR grant applications from Phase II awardees to support additional studies required by a federal regulatory agency in order to sell the final product. Such products typically include, but are not limited to, medical implants, drugs, vaccines, and new treatment or diagnostic tools that require review and approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a regulated product before commercial distribution.

Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NIH staff well in advance of submitting a Phase IIb application. It is expected that only a portion of NIDCD SBIR/STTR Phase II awards will be eligible for additional support through this program.

Phase III

The objective of Phase III, where appropriate, is for the small business concern to pursue with non-SBIR/STTR funds the commercialization objectives resulting from the Phase I/II R/R&D activities.

The SBIR/STTR solicitations and the grant application package are available on the NIH's SBIR/STTR website.

Examples of areas in which small businesses can contribute to the mission of the NIDCD include:

  • Hearing, e.g., new hearing aid and auditory implant technologies, research tools and models for studying the auditory system, viral vectors for gene transfer to the inner ear.
  • Balance, e.g., drug delivery systems, new assessment and rehabilitative technologies.
  • Voice, speech, and language, e.g., new assessment and rehabilitative strategies, animal models.
  • Taste and smell, e.g., drug delivery systems, new diagnostic tools, improved techniques for research.

Contact Information

For additional information on the relevance of research topics to NIDCD mission areas, contact:

Roger L. Miller, Ph.D.

301-402-3458

For administrative and business management questions, contact:

Christopher P. Myers
Grants Management Officer
301-435-0713

For more information, visit NIH’s SBIR/STTR website.

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