You are here

Meet NIDCD Scientists and Grantees

A brief look at the work and ideas of some of the NIDCD's own researchers, as well as scientists whose work is funded by the NIDCD. You can also go to our Scientific Faculty page to see a complete list of NIDCD scientists and the research they do.

Photo: Kristina Simonyan

Kristina Simonyan, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate professor of neurology and otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York

Photo: Diane Bless

Diane Bless, Ph.D.

NIDCD grantee, professor emeritus of surgery and communicative disorders at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Photo: Douglas Drayna,

Dennis Drayna Ph.D.

Chief, Section on Systems Biology of Communication Disorders, Laboratory of Communication Disorders

  • Dr. Drayna's team, along with colleagues from the University of Punjab, the Hollins Communications Research Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, and the NIH Clinical Center, recently published a study that identified three genes as a source of stuttering in volunteers from Pakistan, the U.S., and England. Read the press release here.
  • Dr. Drayna answered some questions about his study.
Photo: Andrew Griffith

Andrew Griffith, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientific Director, NIDCD Intramural Research Program

Photo: Lana Shekim

Lana Shekim, Ph.D.

Program Director, NIDCD Voice and Speech Program

Individual questions and answers from the full interview with Dr. Shekim

Photo: Ingo Titze and Pavarobotti

Ingo R. Titze, Ph.D.

NIDCD Grantee

Dr. Titze directs the National Center for Voice and Speech, located at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts and University of Iowa. We talked to Dr. Titze about his background, his research, and Pavarobotti (a voice simulator/singing robot that Dr. Titze designed).

  • Video: Pavarobotti, a voice simulator/singing robot designed by Dr. Titze
  • Interview (text only): Musically Gifted Engineer Hits a High Note in Voice Research
Photo: Robert Hillman

Robert Hillman, Ph.D.

Harvard Medical School; research director of the Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation at Massachusetts General Hospital

  • Article on research conducted by Robert Hillman, Ph.D.
    This NIDCD-supported scientist has developed a system that uses a smart phone app and a miniature recording device to keep track of how people use their voices for a full week’s worth of talking. Read about the device—so small that rocker Steven Tyler once wore it during a concert—and how it could advance the accuracy of voice disorder diagnosis.
Photo: Kittie Verdolini Abbott

Kittie Verdolini Abbot, Ph.D.

Professor of communication science and disorders in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Services at the Universityof Pittsburgh

Last Updated Date: 
December 16, 2015