Skip to main content
Text Size: sML

NIDCD Highlights

Report Available from State of the Science Conference:
Developmental Stuttering

Scientists are making headway when it comes to understanding stuttering. About 50 percent of stuttering cases are known to be associated with genetic factors, and the other 50 percent are due to unknown causes. Scientists have also discovered many factors that make stuttering worse, such as speaking to a large audience or speaking on the telephone.

The most common type of stuttering is thought to be developmental, because it occurs in children who are in the process of developing speech and language. To address the scientific issues involved in developmental stuttering, NIDCD sponsored a three-day state-of-the-science conference on March 21–23, 2005, in Washington, D.C. In addition to NIDCD, the conference was co-sponsored by the American Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Professional Training, the National Stuttering Association, and the Stuttering Foundation of America. Read the conference summary at www.nidcd.nih.gov/funding/programs/vsl/pages/stutteringwrkshop.aspx. For general information on stuttering, visit our Web site at www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/pages/stutter.aspx.

Top